Earon’s a multi-talented sport star

Earon Isaacs is equally comfortable in soccer, karate and hip-hop dancing.

Pictures: Fuad Esack

She is a real livewire, energetic and explosive or, as the millennials would say, “totally lit”.

An all-round sports fan, she has already excelled at a number of codes, from ball sports to combat sports, you name it, she has tried it.

For starters, she’s a 10-year veteran on the hip hop battle front and, as odd as it may be for a 17-year-old, she’s already retired from dancing competitively having won gold in a major hip-hop championships three years ago.

Goal achieved, time to move on. Next, she established herself as a hip-hop dance instructor at age 15, after obtaining a teaching qualification from the Daphne Jubber School of Dance, in Plumstead.

However, dancing’s taken a bit of a back seat though, as she looks to focus her attention on her other sporting passions – soccer and karate – and, of course, her schooling.

Homeschooled her entire life, Earon is working hard towards obtaining her General Education Diploma (GED), the American equivalent of our matric certificate, which may help with gaining admission to an educational institution or training programme in America.

A student and a junior black belt at Seido Karate in Belgravia Road, she is preparing for her senior black belt promotions in September.

Besides chasing her own personal goals, she is also a team player and member of UCT’s women’s first team soccer squad.She is their current top goal scorer and has already captained the side a few times this season.

“I love the teamwork and bonding that goes through each sport and it is nice if you can get together outside of the dojo or outside of the field or outside of class,” she said.

Considering her goal-scoring prowess it came as no surprise to those who know her that she’s been selected for the Western Cape under-20 women’s team and is set to attend this weekend’s provincial trials.

When not focusing on her own game, she assists with coaching at Farouk Abrahams’ Goalkeeping Academy in Wynberg.

But she’s not just good with her feet, the busy teen says she actually started out with the ball in hand as a budding rugby player wanting to follow in the footsteps of her grandfather.

“He played for City Warriors’ ‘old Crocs’ side at City Park and I would tag along to training,” she said. “Other grandfathers also brought their grandchildren along and soon we formed our own team called the Grand Warriors,” she said.

The soccer bug bit when her father, Earl, introduced her to the beautiful game and the rest is history or, in this case, her story.

“I believe girls should take part in any sport they want to, whether the stereotype deems it as a male sport, there’s no such thing, everything should be inclusive.

“I think women work just as hard, if not harder than men do in different sports,” she said.

If you know of any sporty women we should feature in the Plainsman, call 021 488 4622 or 021 488 4620